We have had the opportunity to run workshops at various locations over the past few years. We have uploaded most of the resources that we used with the various delegates on this page. Feel free to download any of them, all we ask is that you let us know what you think of them by posting a comment below – thank you!

Best wishes,

Johannes and Neal

Schools History Project Conference in Leeds in July 2007:

This was the description of the workshop on the official SHP Conference the programme:

This workshop will present ideas which use multimedia to engage pupils and move their thinking on. “One Lesson Movie” uses Movie Maker to develop understanding of chronology and Thinking SKills with Key Stage 3. “When students teach you a lesson” hands over the Interactive Whiteboard to KS4 pupils to develop meta-thinking on questioning, learning styles and lesson plans. “What did Stalin really sound like?” uses a voice recorder and Audacity” to explore meaning and tone in primary sources with A Level students.

Our presentation: Engagement and Thinking in a Multimedia Classroom

PowerPoint (excluding images of students)

Handout: Engagement and Thinking in a Multimedia Classroom

How to use Movie Maker in the classroom

What did Stalin Sound Like video example:

Civil War sources – sound like

One Lesson Movie (electronic)

Schools History Project Conference in Leeds in July 2008:

This was the description of the workshop on the official SHP Conference the programme:

It is a new school year and you have a dilemma: on the one hand there are a group of bubbly students wanting something original and new, and on the other is a stuffed specification and an impatient senior leader demanding greater ‘value added’. How do you please them both?

This workshop will show how teaching exam groups can be exciting for both you and students, while maintaining a firm grip on results. It will share activities and perspectives on building an enquiry, content choice and teaching techniques. This session is for those people who want to go against the flow and re-invigorate their exam group teaching.

Our presentation – Exam Classes: what are our challenges?

Music by My Machine: Mix it Up on Garageband.com

Handout: Ideas for Teaching Exam Classes (more ideas to be found on www.staffroomproject.com)

Schools History Project Conference in Leeds in July 2009:

This was the description of the workshop on the official SHP Conference the programme:

A Year 10 student told us a horrific story about several people being seriously injured at a water park in Portugal. On holiday they learned about people going to hospital with deep cuts caused by razor blades stuck to the walls of waterslides with bubble gum. You’ve might have heard this urban legend too. It is absolutely 100% urban legend. Yet everyone seems to know it. It’s an idea that has stuck. Don’t you wish that the finer workings Renaissance Medicine or Weimar Government were recalled by students as easily as these silly ideas? This workshop will provide strategies for making GCSE history more memorable and engaging – teaching that is ‘sticky’ and stays in the head of students. Using six clear principles, we aim to show how GCSE units can be developed and enhanced to create a more memorable learning experience.

Our presentation: Create learning that ‘sticks’ at GCSE (uploaded shortly)

30circlestest.pdf

Paul Tibbets

Beckhams

Story

Billy The Kid

Heresy Inference Diagram

Jack the Ripper Venn Diagram

Make Overviews Matter

Settlers Comparison

Oklahoma Mystery

Poem 1918 Annotation

Skills Matter

Tolpuddle Martyrs Mystery

Jack the Ripper Lesson Plan

We have added a brief summary of the talk on The Schools History Forum as well

Talks used during the workshop:

Ted.com: Ben Dunlap talking about Mr. Teszler

Ted.com: Steven Pinkel talking about the myth of violence

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